More fundamental particles and forces

Fermilab is America's premier national laboratory for particle physics research. Particle physicists seek to understand the very building blocks of our universe—the smallest bits of matter and how they interact. Experiments at Fermilab use cutting-edge accelerator and detector technology to learn the secrets of these elementary particles and forces. For decades, thousands of scientists from universities and laboratories around the world have collaborated at Fermilab on experiments at the frontiers of discovery. Scientists at Fermilab discovered.


Muon g-2

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The Muon g-2 experiment will use Fermilab's powerful accelerators to explore the interactions of short-lived particles called muons. If the properties of these particles differ from theoretical predictions, it is a sign that other, undiscovered particles are at work.


Mu2e

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The Mu2e experiment will search for the hypothesized conversion of muons into their lighter cousins, electrons. This type of transformation occurs in other types of particles, but it has yet to be discovered in this particle family.


Holometer

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The Holometer is the first experiment to address the question of whether space and time are quantized or whether they are smooth.


SeaQuest

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SeaQuest explores the structure of the proton and of the particles of which it is made.


CDF

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The CDF experiment studied high-energy collisions at Fermilab's Tevatron particle accelerator. In 1995, scientists at CDF and its sister experiment discovered the top quark, one of the fundamental particles that make up the Standard Model of particle physics. Both experiments made important measurements and served as models for experiments at the Large Hadron Collider.


DZero

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The DZero experiment studied high-energy collisions at Fermilab's Tevatron particle accelerator. In 1995, scientists at DZero and its sister experiment discovered the top quark, one of the fundamental particles that make up the Standard Model of particle physics. Both experiments made important measurements and served as models for experiments at the Large Hadron Collider.