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NOvA: images

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Data collected at the NOvA far detector in northern Minnesota shows one of the first interactions captured at that detector from a beam of man-made neutrinos. The neutrino beam is generated at Fermilab in Illinois and then sent through 500 miles of earth to the far detector. Image courtesy of NOvA collaboration



A graphic representation of one of the first neutrino interactions captured at the NOvA far detector in northern Minnesota. The dotted red line represents the neutrino beam, generated at Fermilab in Illinois and sent through 500 miles of earth to the far detector. The image on the left is a simplified 3-D view of the detector, the top right view shows the interaction from the top of the detector, and the bottom right view shows the interaction from the side of the detector. Illustration courtesy of Fermilab



This seven-minute video titled "NOvA: Building a Next Generation Neutrino Experiment" delves into the process of building the NOvA detectors and the massive collaboration required to make this experiment a reality. Video by Fermilab



Workers at the NOvA hall in northern Minnesota assemble the final block of the far detector in early February 2014, with the nearly completed detector in the background. Each block of the detector measures about 50 feet by 50 feet by 6 feet and is made up of 384 plastic PVC modules, assembled flat on a massive pivoting machine. Photo courtesy of NOvA collaboration



Workers at the NOvA hall in northern Minnesota assemble the final block of the far detector in early February 2014. The project is a collaboration with the University of Minnesota, and roughly 170 students built the modules that make up the far-detector blocks. Photo courtesy of NOvA collaboration



A view of the top of the nearly completed NOvA far detector in northern Minnesota. The detector is made up of 28 PVC blocks, each weighing 417,000 pounds, and spans 51 feet by 51 feet by 200 feet. When it is completed and filled with liquid scintillator, the far detector will weigh 14,000 tons. Photo courtesy of NOvA collaboration



The NOvA detector, currently under construction in Ash River, Minn., stands about 50 feet tall and 50 feet wide. The completed detector will weigh 14,000 tons. Photo by Fermilab



When completed, the NOvA detector will comprise 28 detector blocks, each measuring about 50 feet tall, 50 feet wide and 6 feet deep. Photo by Fermilab



Electronics that make up part of the data acquisition system are installed on the top and side of the detector. The NOvA experiment is a collaboration of 208 scientists from 22 universities and laboratories in the United States and another 16 institutions around the world. The scientists are funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation and funding agencies in the Czech Republic, Greece, India, Russia and the United Kingdom. Photo by Fermilab



Technicians glue modules for the NOvA detector using a machine developed at Argonne National Laboratory. Photo by William Miller, NOvA installation manager



Scientists and engineers at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory developed the 750,000-pound pivoter machine that put the blocks of the NOvA detector in place. Photo by Fermilab



The NOvA detector, located in Ash River, Minn., will study a beam of neutrinos originating 500 miles away at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, located near Chicago. Image by Fermilab




last modified 02/11/2014 |