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NOvA: photos

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This 3D image shows a cosmic-ray muon producing a large shower of energy as it passes through the NOvA far detector in Minnesota. Image courtesy NOvA collaboration.



This 3D image shows a cosmic-ray muon producing a large shower of energy as it passes through the NOvA far detector in Minnesota. Image courtesy NOvA collaboration.



The NOvA detector, currently under construction in Ash River, Minn., stands about 50 feet tall and 50 feet wide. The completed detector will weigh 14,000 tons. Photo by Fermilab.



When completed, the NOvA detector will comprise 28 detector blocks, each measuring about 50 feet tall, 50 feet wide and 6 feet deep. Photo by Fermilab.



Electronics that make up part of the data acquisition system are installed on the top and side of the detector. The NOvA experiment is a collaboration of 169 scientists from 19 universities and laboratories in the U.S and another 15 institutions around the world. The scientists are funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation and funding agencies in the Czech Republic, Greece, India, Russia and the United Kingdom. Photo by Fermilab.



Technicians glue modules for the NOvA detector using a machine developed at Argonne National Laboratory. Photo by William Miller, NOvA installation manager.



Scientists and engineers at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory developed the 750,000-pound pivoter machine that will put the blocks of the NOvA detector in place. Photo by Fermilab.



The NOvA detector, located in Ash River, Minn., will study a beam of neutrinos originating 500 miles away at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, located near Chicago. Image by Fermilab.




last modified 03/28/2013 |