Fermi National Laboratory


NuTeV images

Fermilab physicist and NuTeV cospokesman Bob Bernstein with the NuTeV detector, a 700-ton sandwich of steel, scintillator and drift chambers.
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Members of the NuTeV collaboration, shown here in 1996 with their detector. NuTeV includes scientists from the University of Cincinnati, Columbia University, Fermilab, Kansas State University, Northwestern University, the University of Oregon, the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Rochester.
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With the NuTeV detector as background, Northwestern University graduate student Sam Zeller (left) and Fermilab physicist Mike Shaevitz (right) review the new NuTeV result with Kevin McFarland from the University of Rochester.
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Neutrino detector with electronic readout. The detector uses steel as a target and drift chambers and scintillator counter to capture the details of the neutrino interactions.
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   Precise measurements for other particles, including force-carrying bosons, quarks, electrons and muons, led to the predictions for sine-squared-theta-W for neutrinos. NuTeV experimenters, however, found a result that differed significantly from the predicted value.
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   The NuTeV detector was a 700-ton sandwich with over a hundred slices of alternating steel and particle detectors. Even with 700 tons of target material to hit, only one in a billion neutrinos in the NuTeV beam interacted as it went fromt the first to the last slice.
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last modified 11/5/2001   email Fermilab