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Fermilab Lecture Series presents:
How To Make (Almost) Anything
Dr. Neil Gershenfeld, Director of Center for Bits and Atoms, MIT
Friday,November 12, 2010 @ 8 p.m.
Tickets - $7
Fab Lab Demonstrations in Wilson Hall atrium starting at 1 p.m., including a final demo at 7:15 prior to the lecture.

The Fermilab Lecture Series, the University of Illinois, and the MIT Center for Bits and Atoms will present Fab Lab demonstrations in the Fermilab Wilson Hall lobby from 1 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Friday, November 12. The demonstrations will be followed by a lecture in Ramsey Auditorium entitled How to Make (Almost) Anything by Fab Lab originator Dr. Neil Gershenfeld of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Center for Bits and Atoms.

A Fab Lab (fabrication laboratory) is a small-scale workshop with computer controlled tools that enable individuals to make “almost anything.” Prof. Neil Gershenfeld’s revolutionary laboratory is breaking down boundaries between the digital and physical worlds, from creating molecular quantum computers to virtuosic musical instruments. Technology from fab labs has been seen and used in settings including New York's Museum of Modern Art and rural Indian villages, the White House and the World Economic Forum, inner-city community centers and automobile safety systems, Las Vegas shows and Sami herds. Dr. Gershenfeld is the originator of the growing global network of field fab labs that provide widespread access to prototype tools for personal fabrication, and directs the Fab Academy, the associated program for distributed research and education in the principle and practices of digital fabrication.

Prof. Neil Gershenfeld is the Director of MIT's Center for Bits and Atoms. His unique laboratory is breaking down boundaries between the digital and physical worlds, from creating molecular quantum computers to virtuosic musical instruments. Technology from his lab has been seen and used in settings including New York's Museum of Modern Art and rural Indian villages, the White House and the World Economic Forum, inner-city community centers and automobile safety systems, Las Vegas shows and Sami herds. He is the author of numerous technical publications, patents, and books including Fab, When Things Start To Think, The Nature of Mathematical Modeling, and The Physics of Information Technology, and has been featured in media such as The New York Times, The Economist, and the McNeil/Lehrer News Hour. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, has been named one of Scientific American's 50 leaders in science and technology, has been selected as a CNN/Time/Fortune Principal Voice, and by Prospect/FP as one of the top 100 public intellectuals. Dr. Gershenfeld has a BA in Physics with High Honors and an honorary Doctor of Science from Swarthmore College, a Ph.D. from Cornell University, was a Junior Fellow of the Harvard University Society of Fellows, and a member of the research staff at Bell Labs. Research advances by Dr. Gershenfeld and his students and colleagues working at the boundary between physical science and computer science include: one of the first complete quantum computations, using nuclear spins in molecules; microfluidic bubble logic, with bits that transport materials as well as information; physical one-way cryptographic functions, implemented by mesoscopic light scattering; noise-locked loops that entrain on codes, which led to analog logic integrated circuits that use continuous device dynamics to solve digital problems; Internet 0 for interdevice internetworking; microslot probes for ultra-small-sample structural studies; integrated 6-axis inertial measurement based on the dynamics of trapped particles; and charge source tomography for electric field imaging.

He's the originator of the growing global network of field fab labs that provide widespread access to prototype tools for personal fabrication, and directs the Fab Academy, the associated program for distributed research and education in the principles and practices of digital fabrication.

He plays the bassoon, has ski patrolled and raced, and swam competetively. (Bio courtesy of MIT.)

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